Calling all cardinals

July 6, 2011

Credit: Richard Tsong -Taatarii

Q I’ve been trying to attract cardinals for years with no success. We live near a wetland and there are trees around, plus I have tried seed mixes advertised as cardinal food. Any ideas?

A A funny thing about cardinals is that they’re very loyal to feeding sites, but it can be a challenge to get them to become regular guests. In my experience, a platform bird feeder is the best choice for cardinals, followed by a domed feeder with the dome raised high enough to allow them access.

Read more here

Advertisements

The bird is out there

July 5, 2011

Photo Credit: Margaret Wimmer

From Margaret Wimmer :

I’ve had my bird feeder for over a year, and I’ve gone through some highs and lows. Finding the right seed (the most popular seems to be Food Lion’s cheapo brand), keeping squirrels away (still find one squeezed into the feeder every now and then) and watching my cats destroy screens to get at the birds.
Advertisement | Advertise with Us

But I like my feeder, and enjoy watching the birds swoop in for a snack. Some three at a time. Or, like this bird, it’ll fly in, scratch at the seed and just hang out for spell.

Read more here

Birds in hot weather

July 5, 2011

Photo credit: startribune.com

Hot weather is tough on birds as well as people. They need to avoid overheating, but have fewer ways to deal with heat issues than we do. One way birds cope is to gape and pant; they hold their bills open to facilitate more rapid exchange of air.

You can help at home by making water available in your yard. If you have a bird bath keep it filled with clean water. Bird bath water fouls easily.

Read more here

It’s a quiet time in the bird world

July 5, 2011

It’s a quiet time of the year for birds and birders.

Most of our local residents are busy raising their families and aren’t even all that frequent at bird feeders.

It’s the time of year when birders start looking into other interests, like plants, butterflies, dragonflies and more. The timing couldn’t be better; the recent warm weather helped hatch a great crop of dragonflies that have naturalists busy trying to locate and identify.

Read more here

Summer wildlife makes life interesting

July 4, 2011

If it ain’t one thing, it’s another. In the winter, it’s the deer, in the spring it’s the rabbits and of course when they’re not hibernating, the raccoons are a pain in the butt.

They can shimmy up the skinniest pole, hang from the gutters and even climb up a drain pipe and fly from the roof, landing on the soon-to-be-destroyed bird feeder. They can hang on to the peanut wreath with one claw, use their hind legs to brace themselves on the pole and dig out peanuts with the other claw. Wonderful, they steal the peanuts and destroy the wreath simultaneously.

Read more here

An Organic, Panoramic Bird Feeder Hugs Trees

July 4, 2011

Photos Courtesy of NOS

If you like having birds around your garden, and don’t need a bird feeder that fights crime and aren’t in the mood to make one yourself, there’s a great new model from design firm NOS. Made from organic materials, the 360° Fly-in wraps around a tree trunk, giving you a view of birds feeding from any angle. And as Agustín Otegui Saiz at NOS points out, it’s literally a tree hugger.

Read more here

House finches find a home in Texas

July 4, 2011

Taken from: Kathy Adams Clark

A Sugar Land reader emailed a description of a sparrow-size , reddish-headed bird in her yard. She wondered if it could be an escaped caged bird.

An email from a Hill Country couple recounted their experience with what they thought were small brown sparrows eating birdseed faster than they could supply it.

And a Kingwood resident was excited about finding purple finches at his bird feeder this summer.

Read more: here

Bird sightings: House finch

July 1, 2011

Photo by sltrib.com

House finches can be attracted to nest in a bird box. The female builds the nest from grasses, leaves, twigs and feathers. She incubates 2-6 light blue eggs for 12-14 days. The altricial young (born with eyes closed, naked and helpless) will fledge within 19 days. Both parents will feed the young.

Bird feeders filled with black oil sunflower, thistle and white proso millet will attract house finch.

Read more here

The grace of one small bird

July 1, 2011

I found a wounded bird in our rain gutter, under the big pine trees. I asked my wise and practical mate if we should do something. He felt we should let nature take its course. I accepted his opinion. For almost 10 hours. […]

We buried Sophie in the back by our bird bath, where we dug for her worms.

“What happens to her now?” Her body is dead but her sparkle is still here, because we have good memories of her. “We only got to have her for one day. It makes me so sad. Can we dig her up in a few days and look at her again?”

Read more: here

Bangalore rises to save the bird population

July 1, 2011

Photo by mybangalore.com

Bangalore because of its massive green cover almost three decades back had around 320 bird species. Due to the large scale destruction of bird habitats which includes trees and lakes, the city has lost one third of its bird species in the last 10 years. IT Companies have helped in the bird saving campaigns as well. Ness Technologies had recently unveiled a project “Bring Back the Birds” in which the company planted nectar yielding trees and installed “Bird Bath” in the office campus.

Read more here